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oakfumed

Fumed Spessart Oak

Fumed Oak is not actually a species of oak, but simply is a wood finishing process that darkens wood and brings out the grain pattern. It consists of exposing the wood to fumes from a strong aqueous solution of ammonium hydroxide which reacts with the tannins in the wood. The process works best on white oak because of the high tannin content of this wood. Fumed oak is also called smoked oak. Other species may also be fumed, but usually will not darken as much as white oak.

Color/Appearance: Has a medium yellowish-brown color, though there can be a fair amount of variation in color.

Grain/Texture: Has medium-to-large pores and a fairly coarse grain. May have irregular or interlocked grain depending on growing conditions of the tree.

Endgrain: Diffuse-porous; large to very large pores, very few; solitary and radial multiples; orange/brown deposits occasionally present; growth rings usually indistinct, though sometimes distinct due to terminal parenchyma; rays medium to wide, fairly close spacing; parenchyma scanty to vasicentric, and occasionally marginal (not typical for Khaya spp.).

Rot Resistance: Sessile Oak has been rated as having very good resistance to decay, and is commonly used in boatbuilding applications.

Workability: Easy to glue, and takes stain and finishes very well.

Odor: Has a tell-tale smell that is common to most oaks. Most find it appealing.

Sustainability: This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Common Uses: Cabinetry, furniture, interior trim, flooring, boatbuilding, barrels, and veneer.

Comments:Sessile Oak falls into the white oak group, and shares many of the same traits as White Oak (Quercus alba). The species is nearly identical to English Oak (Quercus robor), and is used extensively for both interior and exterior building applications throughout Europe.